Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge

Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge is one of fifty-nine wildlife refuges managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. These wildlife refuges have been set aside to conserve our nation’s fish, wildlife, and plants — including threatened or endangered species. Our nation’s wildlife refuges are home to more than 700 species of birds, 250 species of mammals, 250 reptile and amphibian species, and more than 200 species of fish.
Anahuac SignThe Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1963 and is one of nineteen wildlife refuges located in the Lone Star State. The name Anahuac is a Nahuatl (an Aztec language) word that means “close to water.” The earliest inhabitants of the region, however, were not Aztecs but Atakapan Indians. The name perfectly fits because Anahuac is indeed near the water.
Anahuac WetlandsThis 34,000-acre refuge is largely coastal marsh land and prairie bordering Galveston Bay in southeast Texas. The marshes, meandering bayous, and prairies of Anahuac are home to an abundance of wildlife, including alligators and bobcats. The Anahuac refuge also serves as a hotel for migrating birds — a place where they can rest, nest, breed, and eat as they continue on their respective journeys.
Anahuac SignIf you want to catch a glimpse of alligators, then Anahuac is the place to be. Southeast Texas is regarded as one of the best places in the nation to see alligators. Spring and fall are the best times to catch sight of these reptiles as they sun themselves on the banks of the bayous. Anahuac is also a paradise for birders. Helpful signs on the driving and walking trails identify the birds you might see in the park — everything from shorebirds, wading birds, migratory songbirds, and more.
Anahuac BoardwalkThe refuge offers a driving loop with places to pull over to watch for certain birds and animals. The walking trails are well maintained and feature boardwalks and benches where you can sit and enjoy the outdoors, including the music of migratory songbirds. If you visit, bring a pair of binoculars with you. You can purchase an inexpensive folding field guide at the park store to help you identify the birds in the refuge.
Anahuac DriveWe are fortunate to have a third of the nation’s wildlife refuges in the Lone Star State. Don’t overlook these outdoor treasures as you plan your Texas adventures. These are great places to connect with the outdoors — beautiful locations where you can walk slowly, breathe deeply, and appreciate the great diversity of wildlife in Texas.
Anahuac Field Guide

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