Bad Rabbit Cafe

The Big Bend region of Texas gives a whole new meaning to the word vast. Out in this part of Texas folks measure distance by the hour rather than by the mile. And there are plenty of hours between here and there when you are exploring the Big Bend.

Of course, food is always on my mind whenever I venture out on one of my Texas road trips. That’s because there are so many fantastic out-of-the-way places to eat in the Lone Star State. And discovering a new place to eat a burger is always on my to-do list when I am on the road.

Now, when it comes to the Big Bend, there are not a whole lot of places to eat — especially when you venture south of Alpine and head toward Terlingua. That’s why its important to plan ahead when road-tripping in Big Bend.
Among the best places to eat in this iconic cowboy country is the Bad Rabbit Cafe at the Terlingua Ranch Lodge. The lodge (or Terlingua Ranch headquarters) is located 16 miles east of Highway 118 about an hour south of Alpine. Just look for the big sign with the yellow Terlingua Ranch logo located at the intersection of Highway 118 and Terlingua Ranch Road.
The Bad Rabbit Cafe is housed in an original ranch structure made of stone and masonry. Very Texas-looking stuff! You’ll love the magnificent views on your drive to the cafe as well as the surrounding mountains and mesas once you arrive. The cafe generally opens at 7:00 AM every day and only closes early on Sundays.

I ordered my usual bacon cheeseburger with a side of hand-cut fries and a tall glass of iced tea. My wife Cheryl and I enjoyed the ambiance of the place while we waited for our meal. Decorated with boots and murals and all kinds of cool stuff, the dining area also serves as a venue for local bands on weekend nights.
My burger arrived quickly and piping hot. The generous portion of meat was especially delicious and all of the veggies were fresh. I also appreciate that the burger came with bacon cooked to crispy perfection. There is nothing that ruins a bacon cheeseburger faster than slices of wimpy bacon. The bread was also delicious.
One bite was all it took to convince me that we had made the right call to eat at the Bad Rabbit. It was definitely worth the drive off the main highway between Alpine and Terlingua. To make our experience even better, the staff was courteous. All in all, this was a really pleasant dining experience. Cheryl and I have already decided that we will visit the Bad Rabbit again for some good Texas grub!

Introducing Dos Arbolitos

When it comes to amazing vistas in Texas, the Trans-Pecos region is at the top of my list. The expansive spaces, distant silhouetted hills, distinctive desert flora, deep in the heart of Texas skies, and mesmerizing chiaroscuro splashed across the faces of desert mesas all work together to create iconic Texas views.
I first felt the call of the Chihuahuan Desert when I was a Boy Scout. My grandfather’s stories about Judge Roy Bean, the Law West of the Pecos, stirred my curiosity about this part of the Lone Star State. I made my first trip to visit the Jersey Lilly when I was a Boy Scout and I was hooked. I loved everything about the desert.
Throughout those years I came across numerous ads about Terlingua Ranch — a rugged 100,000 acres tucked between Big Bend National Park and Big Bend Ranch State Park. For little money, the ads touted, you could own a piece of Texas. These ads drew a lot of people to this remote region. Folks fell in love with what they found and the land started selling like hot cakes and continues to sell to this day.
Last month, through the kindness of a friend, my wife and I were blessed with a remarkable gift — our own little slice of Texas at Terlingua Ranch. I had dreamed about this as a Boy Scout but never imagined that one day I might own land in one of the most iconic regions in Texas. So, we begin a new adventure to develop a place to enjoy off-grid getaways.
We are now the legal owners of a piece of property in the Big Bend Valley with million dollar views in every direction. From our little place we can watch the sun rise over Nine Point Mesa to the East, enjoy the views of the Christmas Mountains to the South, and watch the sun set behind the distant mesas to the West. Amazing stuff any way you slice it.

The next step is to have our land surveyed, confirm our corners, and get our metes and bounds document. Through the kindness of another friend, all of this is in motion. We are taking this a step at a time, don’t want to incur any debt in the process, and are excited about watching things unfold.

As Cheryl and I talked about a name for our little slice of heaven in Texas, we immediately agreed on Dos Arbolitos, translated Two Saplings. This is actually the name of one of our favorite Spanish songs. Translated, the lyrics say, in part:

Two little trees have been born on my ranch,
Two little trees that look like twins,
And from my little house I see them alone,
Under the holy protection and the light of the heavens.

They are never separated one from the other
Because God wanted the two born that way,
And with their very branches they caress each other
As if they were bride and groom that loved each other.

We are beyond thankful for this unexpected blessing. Whenever I need to clear my head and my heart, I always seem to head West toward the Chihuahuan Desert. And when I do, I always come home refreshed after enjoying the views, watching the sun set, and sitting under the stars. There are no words to express what it means to call Texas home and to have been blessed with Dos Arbolitos.
I have added a new Dos Arbolitos category and will post updates as things continue to unfold. We know it is going to be a long process and we are committed to enjoying the journey. Thanks for following my adventures in the Lone Star State.

Another Time Soda Fountain and Cafe

I love small town diners — perhaps because of the nostalgia but certainly for their food and all that these local eateries mean to the life of a community. I prefer dining at places where I know it will take a while for my food to arrive and I can fill the waiting time with good conversation.

As the pace of life grew increasingly faster, old-fashioned diners and cafes began to disappear from the culinary landscape. As for their replacement, we got faster service but not necessarily better food or a better dining experience. There is something to be said about eateries where things move just a bit slower.
There is just such a place in Rosenberg, a small town just outside of Houston. Appropriately named Another Time Soda Fountain and Cafe, walking through the doors of this place is like stepping into a time machine. From the decor to the menu, this is the kind of place that just sort of hugs your heart and mind when you walk in.
This place has it all — amazing hamburgers, made from scratch meals, malts made with real ice cream, banana splits, and an array of delicious desserts. They even have soda jerks that will prepare you a fountain drink the way they used to back in the 50’s. And, to make your dining experience even more memorable, the cafe is appointed with some pretty cool period decor.
As I always do when I try out a new place, I ordered a bacon cheeseburger, onion rings, and a cold glass of tea. The menu even states, “Please allow extra time for grilling.” I like that. I was not in any hurry and really wanted to soak in the atmosphere.
Once my burger arrived I cut it in half. Those of you who follow my blog know that I have this thing about burger strata. I just have to see what things look like under the hood and how a burger is put together, layer by layer. And wow, this burger had a big ol’ thick helping of meat with the bacon cooked to crispy perfection (just the way I like it).
I believe that the first bite always tells the story. If the first bite is bad then there is no reason to believe that the bites that follow will be any better. But if the first bite is good —oh my soul — then you can count on every bite that follows to keep a smile on your face.

My burger immediately passed the first bite test — really good. Everything about this old-fashioned burger was right. From the grilled bun to everything else, this was one delicious burger. I eat slow anyway, but I ate this burger even slower than usual because I wanted to savor every bite.
My mountain biking friend who was dining with me asked me if I have ever eaten a bad burger on my quest to find the best burgers in the Lone Star State. “Absolutely,” I replied. “But, this is not one of those burgers that is big on bragging and a failure on flavor.” This burger passed the test and is now on my list of burgers that I can recommend without hesitation.
You may live a long way from Rosenberg, but I’ll bet you don’t live a long way from a good burger near you. As long as you have to eat, make eating more of an adventure by searching for and trying places off the fast food highway. Remember to eat slow and have meaningful conversation around the table — just like it was done in another time.

My Ozark Trail ConnecTent

My weakness is outdoor gear. When I get home in the evenings I like to peruse YouTube in search of the latest camping or hiking or anything-outdoors gear reviews. So, it should come as no surprise that I have all sorts of gear crammed onto the shelves in my garage. And, because I am a trekking pole junkie, I keep no less than three sets of trekking poles in my pickup truck at all times. Better to be prepared!

While recently watching a YouTube review of the latest in tents for car camping, I was wowed by a cube tent that attaches to the framework of a straight-leg 10 x 10 pop-up canopy. Amazingly simple and fast set-up that yields lots of usable square footage that, honestly, is closer to the glamping side of the camping equation.
After doing some research, I found a very affordable version of this tent — the Ozark Trail ConnecTent. So, I placed my order on Amazon and then waited with all of the patience of a kid on Christmas Eve. When my packages finally arrived I couldn’t wait to get home to set everything up in my backyard. And then, it rained!
At the first available opportunity, I unpacked everything in my backyard and proceeded to set up the tent. Although I managed to set my tent up by myself, the set-up of this particular tent would have been a bit easier with an extra hand to help. My wife Cheryl arrived home just in time to help me finish the job.
Setting up this tent is really pretty intuitive. I began by setting up the pop-up canopy. It is important to have a straight-leg rather than a slant-leg canopy in order to properly attach this particular tent. I raised the canopy to the lowest position and then proceeded to clip the tent to the framework. Very easy stuff.
Once I had everything clipped into place, I staked down the tent. A particular feature that I like about the pop-up canopy is that it comes with four guy-lines already attached to the corners. This adds a good extra measure of stability, especially to withstand high winds.
The inside of the tent is huge. I set up my camping cot just to get a feel for the interior space. Love the spaciousness of this tent. Perfect for car camping when I have the luxury of bringing extra stuff to set up a more comfortable base camp for hiking or biking in a state park.

I will have my first opportunity to use my new ConnecTent under the big Texas sky when I attend the Llano Earth Art Festival during Spring Break. I have a camp site reserved and can’t wait to set up my tent for a fun weekend outdoors. Will write more after the festival in Llano. Until then, happy camping!

2018 Chihuahuan Desert Bike Fest

For the third year in a row, I drove across the Lone Star State with friends to participate in the Chihuahuan Desert Mountain Bike Endurance Fest. We loaded our mountain bikes and camping gear at four in the morning on Valentine’s Day and arrived at Big Bend Ranch State Park at four in the afternoon.
We wasted no time in getting our base camp set up at the Maverick Ranch RV Park in Lajitas. This park serves as ground zero for the Chihuahuan Desert Bike Fest that draws upwards of 500 mountain bikers from around the nation. For three days on Presidents Day weekend in February, the RV park becomes a small town with a population several times greater than that of Lajitas.
Big Bend Ranch State Park features some amazing trails, including a 50-plus mile Epic Loop rated as one of the best trails in the country by the International Mountain Biking Association. No worries, however, if you are hesitant to tackle a torturous trail like the Epic Loop. The bike fest is a non-competitive event that features a variety of guided rides for every skill level.
After setting up our campsite, we mounted our bikes and headed east toward the Buena Suerte Trail to get a ride in before sunset. The Buena Suerte trail is a wide jeep trail that leads to several single track trails that range in difficulty from easy to pretty hard stuff to ride.
Over the course of our two and a half days, we managed to rack up close to eighty-miles on the trails. While we all enjoyed riding our own mountain bikes, we couldn’t resist checking out the more expensive mountain bikes made available by the country’s biggest bike brands.
On our second day, I opted to try the Cannondale Monterra 2 electric mountain bike with full suspension and fat tires. This is one amazing mountain bike that features four electronic settings that make trail riding a whole new experience. This bike is nothing short of amazing. It was so much fun to ride and the fat tires just ate up the trails.The best part of an event like the Chihuahuan Desert Bike Fest is sharing the adventure with friends. We had a blast checking out new trails, stopping to take pics along the way, back-tracking to repeat fun sections of the trails, eating some delicious meals, and sitting around the campfire in the evenings.
I was especially glad to run into Karen Hoffman Blizzard and David Heinicke, two friends I met on my first ride two years ago. Karen is a contributing writer to Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine and David is the head naturalist at Brazos Bend State Park. They were great encouragers to me on my first ride and shepherded me down a trail that was a little above my riding skills at that time.
If you enjoy mountain biking then make it a point to do the Chihuahuan Desert Bike Fest. This ride is sponsored by Desert Sports of Terlingua, Big Bend Ranch State Park, and Lajitas Resort. If you are interested in riding, then be sure to register early. The event is capped at 500 riders and fills up well before the registration deadline. I think you’ll agree that this ride is unquestionably one of the best things going for mountain bikers in the Lone Star State.

Pappa Gyros Greek-American Food

In my ongoing quest to discover the best burgers in the Lone Star State, I have pulled into more than one sketchy looking burger joint to check things out. In the process I have learned that unless you are willing to take a risk you are likely to miss some of the best eating in Texas.

That said, I must confess that I almost missed eating one of the best burgers I have ever had — not because the joint looked sketchy but because it was a place that did not specialize in burgers. To add to my indecisiveness about whether to walk in the doors is the fact that this joint is attached to a Shell station.
Pappa Gyros is located at the corner of Kingsland Boulevard and the Grand Parkway in my hometown of Katy. It is easy to miss because it occupies the south end of the Shell station on the southeast corner of the intersection. This place specializes in Greek food (which I enjoy) and American dishes.

I recently joined some friends to give Pappa Gyros a try. They assured me that they did offer burgers on the menu. So, I decided to be that guy that orders a burger at an ethnic food joint. Why not? After all, I was really hungry for a good burger.

Pappa Gyros is packed into a tight little space with a few tables and some bar seating. I noticed that their drive-thru service stayed pretty busy the whole time we were there. That was absolutely a good sign.
I ordered my usual bacon-cheeseburger and opted for a side of fries and some tea. My order arrived in good time. I did ask them to cut my burger in half, something I like to do in order to get a good look at the strata — a view of all of the burger layers and components.
The generous patty was cooked just the way I like it. All of the fixings were clearly fresh and the bacon was thick and crispy. One of the things that, in my estimation, ruins a good bacon cheeseburger is wimpy bacon. So, seeing the thick slabs of bacon cooked on the crispier side of the scale was a good sign for me.

As for the first bite, immediate confirmation that I had made the right choice. This burger was among the best I have had. Every bite brought a smile to my heart. Really good. And to think that I had almost missed this opportunity because I was judging a book by its cover. Goes to show you that you can find a good burger in the most unlikely places.

I have since recommended Pappa Gyros to friends who have thanked me for doing so. I certainly plan on visiting Papa Gyros again since it is only a couple of miles from my home. I encourage you to explore your own neck of the woods to discover a burger joint near your home. And remember to look past some of the things that might discourage you from giving a place a try. You just might find one of the best burgers you have ever had in the Lone Star State.

Salt Basin Dunes

Immediately west of the towering escarpment of the Guadalupe Mountains lies an other-worldly landscape. The Salt Basin Dunes rise modestly above the surrounding salt flats, the remnants of an ancient sea. These dunes of snow-white gypsum are formed by the collaborative artistry of the winds and the white sands of the salt flats.

The process is not entirely complicated. When the winds whip across the salt flats they pick up tiny crystals of gypsum. When these airborne grains slam against the western wall of the Guadalupe Mountains they are deflected upward and then fall back to earth to form the undulating landscape of the Salt Basin Dunes.
From the top of Guadalupe Peak, the highest point in Texas, the salt flats seem strangely out-of-place in the otherwise desert-looking landscape. They have the appearance of snow blanketing the floor of the Chihuahuan Desert. The sight of the salt flats from Guadalupe Peak is quite spectacular and beckons exploring.
The Salt Basin Dunes are a part of Guadalupe Mountains National Park and are accessible by ranch roads not far from Dell City. This day use area offers access to the salt dunes by way of a two-plus mile hike. Because this is a delicate ecosystem, visitors should stay on the trail and not break the fragile cryptobiotic crust beyond the trail. This thin crusty topsoil is essential for preventing erosion, producing soil nitrogen, and stabilizing the soil for vegetation to take hold. So, don’t bust the crust!
The dunes themselves are pretty spectacular. Although this seems to be the most inhospitable of environments, animal tracks in the sand indicate the presence of nocturnal animal activity.  Various desert plants also accentuate the stark white dunes. Yucca, cholla, cactus, and various grasses have staked their claim to life on these shifting dunes.

While the view of the dunes is beautiful from atop Guadalupe Peak, the view of Guadalupe Peak is awe-inspiring from the dunes. You can, in fact, see five of the seven named peaks in Texas that rise over 8,000 feet. From north to south you can see Bush Mountain, Bartlett Peak, Shumard Mountain, Guadalupe Peak, and El Capitan keeping vigil over the dunes.

Regardless of when you visit the Salt Basin Dunes be sure to carry more water than you think you’ll need, a snack or two, and sunscreen in your day-hike bag. Stay on the trail. Have fun exploring the dunes. Take lots of pics. Take a moment to stop and enjoy the silence of the desert. Look toward the east and breathe in the beauty of the Guadalupe Mountains. And, leave no trace but your footprints in the sand.

My Camp Shower

Note: This is my first installment in my new Outdoor Gear blog category. Having and using the right gear is an essential part of enjoying adventures in the Lone Star State.

I absolutely love to camp out. From my days as a Boy Scout to today, I love everything about camping — including the preparation. Preparing to camp or the anticipation of heading out on an outdoor adventure is a big part of the fun. I am one of those guys who enjoys walking slowly down the camping aisles at local sports and outdoors stores. I just like looking at camping stuff and, occasionally, adding an additional piece of gear to my collection.
When it comes to camp hygiene, I have tried everything from baby wipes to solar showers to compact backpacking showers. While camping in the bush in Tanzania and later venturing down one of the trans-Himalayan rivers in South Asia, I relied on my solar shower. I just set it out at the start of the day, let it heat up, and then enjoyed a refreshing rinse at the end of the day.
I added a compact pocket shower when I ventured to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and camped for a week on the shores of Lake Tanganyika. It was the perfect piece of gear for washing my hair in the mornings and taking a quick rinse at the end of the day. Like my larger solar shower, this compact version worked really well.

Of course, the only drawback to both of these pieces of gear is that you need something from which to hang the shower. Add a couple of gallons of water and now you have to find something that can hold sixteen-plus pounds of water weight. That can be hard to do at times. On my recent camping trip to the Guadalupe Mountains, finding a place to hang my camp shower at my base camp proved to be a challenge.

So, I looked at other shower options for my car camping adventures in the Lone Star State. As it turned out, camp showers can be a bit pricey. I needed something that could sit on the ground to eliminate the frustration of positioning a shower bag on a tree limb. And I needed something that could save water and still get the job done. So, I decided that a camp shower hack was the answer — something that would cost me a fraction of the price of a camping shower unit.
The answer: turn a multi-purpose garden sprayer into a shower unit. The only thing to keep in mind here is to start with a new unit rather than one that has been used to spray garden chemicals. I opted to buy a RoundUp brand 2-gallon garden sprayer unit. Because the sprayer hose was not very long, I also purchased a generic kitchen spray hose (the kind that fits onto a kitchen sink spray nozzle) to lengthen the hose. The only other items I needed were two couplings.
Within a matter of minutes, some quick splicing and coupling of the hoses, I had my shower unit. I chose to use the fan-spray nozzle that came with the sprayer. This nozzle produces a heavy mist spray that also saves water. A few pumps to build up pressure in the sprayer and my shower was fully operational. Of course, I did test it in my shower stall at home. Worked as good as I had hoped.
My new camping shower will now be a part of my car camping gear, along with my pop-up privacy shower tent. No more worries about hanging stuff from a tree branch. I will now be able to enjoy a refreshing shower wherever I car camp. The only other thing I will do is to paint the unit black to absorb more heat in the day time, leaving a clear strip on one side to monitor my water level.
Here is my all-in cost for my camping shower hack (figures rounded up):

• Garden Sprayer | $20.00 | I could have saved $10.00 by opting for a one-gallon unit.

• Kitchen Sink Sprayer Hose | $5.00

• Two Couplings | $10.00

G.W.’s Hickory Pit BBQ & Burger House

Honestly, I don’t think there is ever a bad time to eat a burger. In fact, I could actually live on burgers — while still observing Taco Tuesdays, of course. That said, I am always on the lookout for new places to indulge my appetite for a delicious bacon cheeseburger.
After a recent trip to bike the trails at Huntsville State Park, my friends and I decided to drive to Coldspring for a burger. I love little Texas towns like Coldspring — the small friendly places that lie between the bigger places on the map.

The first post office at this little settlement opened in 1847 and was named Coonskin. A year later the name was changed to Fireman’s Hill. In 1850 the name was changed to Cold Spring for the spring water found there. In 1894, the name was officially respelled Coldspring.
My biking buddies and I decided to stop at GW’s Hickory Pit BBQ and Burger House. This place has all the markings of a dive and all the promise of finding hidden treasure. The sign out front boasted what we hoped would prove true: “This stuff is so good that if you get some on your forehead your tongue will beat you to death to get to it.”
I ordered a bacon cheeseburger and opted for crispy fries because they were fresh out of onion rings. I smiled the second I noticed the cook slapping a big patty on the grill. That was a good sign, indeed. And t made the waiting all the harder. A few minutes later my burger arrived nestled next to a jumble of hot fries. Wow! This was one big burger. The thick slabs of bacon were cooked to crispy perfection. This was another good sign since I have no tolerance for wimpy bacon.
I cut my burger in half and took my first bite. No need for a second bite to confirm that we had made the right choice by stopping at GW’s. Absolutely tasty. As with all good burgers I have found on my burger quest, I savored every mouth-watering bite.

Once again, taking a risk on a dive proved to be a better decision than opting for the convenience of a fast food chain. No regrets about stopping at GW’s. This is one burger I would definitely try again — and again. So, if you ever find yourself anywhere near Coldspring, stop by GW’s and try one of their burgers. You’ll be glad you did.

La Lomita Chapel

The small white chapel stands on La Lomita or “the little hill” located just a few miles south of the town of Mission. The restored chapel is a reminder of earlier days when the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI) traveled by horseback up and down the Rio Grande Valley. These circuit-riding padres baptized babies, performed marriage ceremonies, gave last rights, and listened to confessions.
The land on which the mission stands was originally part of a Spanish land grant awarded in 1767. John Davis Bradburn purchased the property in 1842 and died two months later. His Mexican widow sold the property to a French merchant named René Guyard in 1845. Guyard died in 1861 and left the La Lomita grant to two Oblate priests “for the propagation of the faith among the barbarians.”
La Lomita played an instrumental role in the spread of Catholicism in South Texas. Located between mission centers in Brownsville and Roma, La Lomita became a strategic mission center for what became known as the Cavalry of Christ. These circuit-riding Oblates were some kind of tough. They faced all kinds of challenges and dangers in their efforts to spread their faith throughout South Texas.
The original chapel, built at a campsite along the Brownsville-Roma Trail, suffered flood damage more than once because of its proximity to the Rio Grande River. That original chapel was washed away by flood waters in 1865 and was rebuilt in 1899 at its present site at La Lomita. Over the years this chapel has sustained hurricane damage and suffered the normal deterioration caused by age. Today, thanks to restoration initiatives, the chapel is in good repair and continues to attract both the faithful and the curious.
When my hometown of Mission was founded in 1908, the town was named Mission in honor of the wide-ranging ministry of the Oblates. In 1975, La Lomita was added to the National Register of Historic Places, the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. In 1976, the city of Mission added visitor amenities to make the historic La Lomita a family friendly municipal park.
Places like La Lomita absolutely stir my imagination. As I walked the grounds I reflected on the hardy ranchers who tamed this southernmost part of the Lone Star State. I also thought about the tough cowboy-priests who rode from ranch to ranch to care for their flock. And, of course, I wondered about all who came (and still some) to this little place of worship with their burdens, anxieties, dreams and prayers — who lit their candles as an earnest expression of their hopes for answers and miracles.
La Lomita, like the Painted Churches and other historical places of worship, is a great road trip destination. Places like this remind us of an important part of our Texas history — the role of faith in the lives of those who settled the Lone Star State.